The Computer Science MSc provides a balance between computer science theory and practical software engineering skills, including teamwork for industrial or research clients. Graduates complement their first degree subject with computer science knowledge, leading to interdisciplinary industrial positions and PhD research.

The student is expected to complement his learning with extra research and personal work.

You will learn fundamental aspects of how computers work by taking modules in computer architecture, databases, data structures and algorithms. You will also gain practical knowledge in areas such as human-computer interaction, application design, and software engineering. You will also develop programming skills in modern languages.

Team working, project planning and communication skills are developed by working in small groups developing software for real industrial and research clients. Optional modules allow specialisation in subjects such as functional programming, computer music, entrepreneurship and machine learning.

The programme is delivered through a combination of traditional face-to-face lectures, flipped learning, blended learning, problem-based and student-led learning. Lectures are often supported by laboratory work with help from demonstrators.

Student performance is assessed by unseen written examinations, coursework and a substantial individual project.

The programme aims to provide stepping stones to pursue a career in the computing/information technology sector or for further doctoral research.

MSc Computer Science comprises 8 taught modules and an Individual Project Report. Of the taught modules, 5 are core, with either 3 option modules, 2 option and 1 elective modules, or 1 option and 2 elective modules.

Compulsory / Core Modules

All modules in this group are compulsory.

Elective Modules

Choose a minimum of 0 credits and a maximum of 30 credits from these popular optional modules.

All choices are subject to timetabling and resource constraints and the approval of the relevant Module Tutors.

Syllabus content for all postgraduate modules can we found in the Department of Computer Science 2018/19 online syllabus pages.


Programme diet (modules available to you)

Your programme has a set curriculum (also called a diet) which prescribes in what combinations modules can be taken, any restrictions on doing so, and how much credit can and must be taken. The programme information pages show which modules form part of each programme, with links to descriptions and module syllabus information. Modules within a programme can be core, optional, or elective, which reflects whether they must be taken or are optionally taken.

Core modules

Core modules are fundamental to your programme’s core curriculum and are mandatory. You will automatically be registered on your programme's core modules, so will not have to select them. You are guaranteed a place on modules that are core for your programme. There will be no timetable clashes between core modules within a programme.

Optional modules

Optional modules are usually closely related to the programme's core curriculum and you will be able to choose which to take; choices are usually made from within specific groups (for example, choose two optional modules from one group and three from another, etc.) You are not guaranteed a place on optional modules as space is strictly limited. We allocate places on a first come, first serve basis, with preference given to Computer Science students over those of other departments. Bear in mind that some modules have prerequisites that must be met in order to be eligible for a place (see the module syllabus for information.)

Elective modules

Elective modules are usually not specifically related to the programme's curriculum. There is no guarantee of being accepted onto an elective module; they are core and/ or optional on other programme diets, so students on those programmes will be given priority. As with optional modules, some electives have prerequisites that must be met.


Deciding which modules to select

The programme information pages show which modules form part of each programme, with links to detailed module syllabus information and reading lists. You may be able to virtually audit lectures for some modules to get a sense of how the module is delivered. You can look up the timetable for each module via the common timetable to get a sense of the timetable that would eventuate from your module choices, which is an important consideration when making your final choices; you should aim to achieve a timetable that is feasible and will not stretch you too thinly.

Bear in mind that places on optional and elective modules are not guaranteed, so you might not always be able to take all your first choices. In that case, it is a good idea to have a second preference in mind.

If you need guidance with choosing which modules to select then please contact your Programme Director or the Departmental Tutor.

A minimum of an upper second-class UK Bachelor's degree in a subject other than computer science or information technology, or an overseas qualification of an equivalent standard is required. Evidence should be included within the application to demonstrate suitable mathematical skills (to at least Mathematics A level), and analytical skills.

Note: Although, the current course is meant for all those who are new to Computer Science, the applicant must ensure she/he has good computational thinking skills as programming is a core part of the course.

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.

The English language level for this programme is: Good.

Further information can be found on our English language requirements page.

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from the International Students website.

2019/20 Tuition Fees

UK/EU Fees (FT):

£12750 for 2019/20

UK/EU Fees (PT):

N/A for 2019/20

Overseas Fees (FT):

£28410 for 2019/20

Overseas Fees (PT):

N/A for 2019/20

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Computer Science is offering Excellence Scholarships to our taught postgraduate students. To check your eligibility and to apply, see the Computer Science Excellence Scholarship application form.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarship and Funding website.

Tuition Fee Deposit

This programme requires that applicants firmly accepting their offer pay a deposit. This allows UCL to effectively plan student numbers, as students are more demonstrably committed towards commencing their studies with us.

For full details about the UCL tuition fee deposit, please see the central UCL pages.

Tuition fee deposits within the Department of Computer Science are currently listed as:

UK/EUOverseas
Full-time*Part-timeFull-time*Part-time
£2000£1000£2000£1000
*only applicable where part-time is an available mode of study

Top graduate destinations include:

Top graduate roles include:

Top further study destinations:

  • Accenture
  • Barclays
  • Cap Gemini
  • Cisco
  • Implementation specialist
  • Java Developer
  • Software Engineer
  • Technology Consultant
  • University of Cambridge
  • UCL
  • University of Sciences, Paris

Average starting salary £31,200 (all data from Graduate Surveys, January 2014)

Programme Administrator

Elizabeth Awad

For queries, please contact the team on the email below.

Office: 5.22, Malet Place Engineering Building

Telephone: +44 (0) 20 7679 3674

Email: msccs-admissions@cs.ucl.ac.uk

Click here for more information

To apply now click here.

Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places, later applications may be less successful.

Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

Deadline for submission of applications is 17:00 on 26th April 2019, including references and additional documents.