COMP0063 Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Security and Privacy

This database contains the 2018-19 versions of syllabuses. These are still being finalised and changes may occur before the start of the session.

Syllabuses from the 2017-18 session are available here.

Academic session

2018-19

Module

Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Security and Privacy

Code

COMP0063

Module delivery

1819/A7P/T1/COMP0063 Postgraduate

Related deliveries

None

Prior deliveries

COMPGA19

Level

Postgraduate

FHEQ Level

L7

FHEQ credits

15

Term/s

Term 1

Module leader

Caulfield, Tristan

Contributors

Caulfield, Tristan

Module administrator

Bottomley, Samantha

Aims

Upon completion of the course the students are expected to be:Aware of the conceptual foundations of security policy and technology and their role in delivering robust, reliable systemsSpecialists in understanding the political context within which security policy and its implementation is situatedSpecialists in understanding the design and implementation of security policy from the perspective of economics, including ideas and tools from areas such as utility theory, game theory, and portfolio theory.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, a student will be able to:

  1. understand concepts and philosophy of security and privacy, including:
    1. declarative and operational concepts;
    2. the relationships between security and privacy;
    3. the relationships between people, policy, and systems
  2. understand politics of security and privacy, including:
    1. the perspectives of individuals, companies, and governments;
    2. international relations, strategy, cyber-conflict;
    3. understanding tensions in policy and legislation
  3. understand economics of security and privacy, including:
    1. utility, incentives, public goods, externalities and internalities, and trade-offs;
    2. games in security and privacy;
    3. using models to understand policy, technology, and decision-making.
  4. develop conceptual analyses of systems and policies in socio-economic contexts;
  5. assess the consequences and value of models of security and privacy;
  6. organize and communicate complex ideas and arguments in precise, accessible written form.

Availability and prerequisites

This module delivery is available for selection on the below-listed programmes. The relevant programme structure will specify whether the module is core, optional, or elective.

In order to be eligible to select this module as optional or elective, where available, students must meet all prerequisite conditions to the satisfaction of the module leader. Places for students taking the module as optional or elective are limited and will be allocated according to the department’s module selection policy.

Programmes on which available:

  • MSc Information Security
  • MSc Information Security (Part time) (Year 1)
  • MSc Information Security (Part time) (Year 2)

Prerequisites:

In order to be eligible to select this module, students must also select Computer Security 1 (COMP0054)

Content

The module covers in depth major issues in computer, information, and general security related to the following perspectives:

  • Conceptual and philosophical foundations of security policy and its implementation in systems’ contexts
  • The political context within which security policies and their implementations are situated, including national and international security issues and the relationships between individuals, companies, and governments
  • The design and implementation of security policy from the perspective of economics, including ideas and tools from areas such as utility theory, game theory, and portfolio theory.

An indicative reading list is available via http://readinglists.ucl.ac.uk/departments/comps_eng.html.

Delivery

The module is delivered through a combination of lectures, guest lectures, tutorials, and self-directed learning.

Weekly tutorials, staffed by the lecturer and Teaching Assistants, will support the material presented in the lectures and the coursework, the completion of which will require significant independent study.

Assessment

This module delivery is assessed as below:

#

Title

Weight (%)

Notes

1

Essay 1

25

 

2

Essay 2

35

 

3

Essay 3

40

 

In order to pass this module delivery, students must achieve an overall weighted module mark of 50%.